197 Arete

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197 Arete
Discovery[1]
Discovered byJohann Palisa
Discovery date21 May 1879
Designations
(197) Arete
Pronunciation/əˈrt/[2]
Named after
Arete
1934 RE1 1950 DY
Asteroid belt
Orbital characteristics[3][4]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc136.89 yr (50000 d)
Aphelion3.1882283 AU (476.95216 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion2.2897600 AU (342.54322 Gm) (q)
2.7389941 AU (409.74769 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity0.1640143 (e)
4.53 yr (1655.7 d)
20.361539° (M)
0° 13m 2.744s / day (n)
Inclination8.793773° (i)
81.607160° (Ω)
246.46589° (ω)
Earth MOID1.29448 AU (193.651 Gm)
Jupiter MOID2.16829 AU (324.372 Gm)
TJupiter3.314
Physical characteristics[8]
Dimensions29.18±2.4 km
6.6084 h (0.27535 d)[3]
6.54 h[5]
0.4417±0.083[3]
0.442[6]
S[7]
9.18[3]

Arete (minor planet designation: 197 Arete) is an asteroid in the asteroid belt. It has a very bright surface, even so when compared to other rocky S-type asteroid.

It was discovered by J. Palisa on May 21, 1879, and named after Arete, the mother of Nausicaa in Homer's The Odyssey.[9] Every 18 years, this asteroid approaches within 0.04 AU of 4 Vesta. During these encounters, Vesta causes a gravitational perturbation of Arete, allowing the mass of Vesta to be directly determined.[10]

Photometric observations during 1984 showed a rotation period of 6.54 ± 0.02 hours and a brightness variation of 0.10 ± 0.01 in magnitude. The light curve shows "four well defined extrema with two asymmetric maxima".[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/iau/lists/NumberedMPs.html
  2. ^ Benjamin Smith (1903) The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  3. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 197 Arete" (2011-07-02 last obs). Archived from the original on 21 July 2011. Retrieved 18 August 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "AstDys: 197 Arete". Retrieved 18 August 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ http://sbn.psi.edu/pds/resource/lc.html
  6. ^ "Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)". Archived from the original on 24 February 2005. Retrieved 24 February 2005. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ http://spiff.rit.edu/richmond/parallax/phot/LCSUMPUB.TXT
  8. ^ "The Asteroid Orbital Elements Database". astorb. Lowell Observatory.
  9. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names. 1 (5th ed.). Berlin Heidelberg New York: Springer-Verlag. pp. 32–33. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.
  10. ^ Hertz, Hans G. (19 April 1968). "Mass of Vesta". Science. 160 (3825): 299–300. Bibcode:1968Sci...160..299H. doi:10.1126/science.160.3825.299. PMID 17788233.
  11. ^ di Martino, M.; Zappala, V.; de Campos, J. A.; Debehogne, H.; Lagerkvist, C.-I. (September 1988), "Rotational properties and lightcurves of the minor planets 94, 107, 197, 201, 360, 451, 511 and 702", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series, 67 (1): 95–101, Bibcode:1987A&AS...67...95D.

External links[edit]