Talk:Planes, Trains and Automobiles

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Duration of trip[edit]

Was it two days, as stated in the intro paragraph, or three days, as given in the plot section? IIRC they have two nights, so might depend on your definition - could have been ~48 hours [2 days] or included time in a total of 3 days.137.222.114.238 (talk) 19:46, 2 January 2011 (UTC)

Quotes[edit]

I recommend removing this quote. It seems to be obviously there for the sake of plastering "fuck" all over an article with legitimate purposes. It looks pretty pathetic to have a short summary and a big quote at the end (which really contributes nothing to the article). We should develop the article to look more like other movie articles. If there are no votes against removal, please remove it.--Will2k 17:26, Apr 13, 2005 (UTC)

If does stay (which I don't think it should) it should be uncensored. Cosmos 23:28, 30 January 2007 (UTC)

I removed it. It was not necesary for that to be on there.

I found a youtube clip that counts 19 f*%ks in total, but it is 18 for Steve Martin and 1 for Edie McClurg (see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-9g9lZSefI) —Preceding unsigned comment added by Dresi (talkcontribs) 22:30, 13 April 2008 (UTC)

Abbott and Costello[edit]

Comparing the characters to Abbott and Costello is not WP:NPOV and WP:OR, so I removed them. Chewbacca1010 20:08, 9 December 2006 (UTC)

Correction[edit]

The character Neil Page uses the word 'fuck' 18 times in the famous scene, not 19 as mentioned in the article. The word is said 19 times but the final usage comes from the ticket agent (Edie McClurg). --Bentonia School 12:44, 11 September 2007 (UTC)

It also wasn't the word "fuck" that Neil uses, it was "fucking", Edie McClurg says "You're fucked"...... If any of that really even matters. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Fireman71 (talkcontribs) 20:11, 31 December 2007 (UTC)

Thanks, I forgot to sign the last post. --Fireman71 (talk) 15:21, 1 January 2008 (UTC)

WikiProject class rating[edit]

This article was automatically assessed because at least one WikiProject had rated the article as start, and the rating on other projects was brought up to start class. BetacommandBot 01:48, 9 November 2007 (UTC)

The moral to the story[edit]

As long as you are more patient enough, you will never know where your next friend will be. SolanaRanger (talk) 22:05, 30 May 2009 (UTC)

They were in Wisconsin when their car was impounded[edit]

Although the map shows that Neal and Del went from Missouri into Illinois and to Chicago; they did go to Wisconsin for a short time. This is where they met Wisconsin State Trooper Michael McKean who impounds their car and they have to ride in the back of a milk truck to get to Chicago. This can be proven by looking at the right side panel of the police car when he pulls out of his hiding place to chase Neal and Del. The right side panel of the police car clearly shows the state of Wisconsin. It was states at the IMDB that there was a scene that explained how they wound up in Wisconsin, but, obviously after the fire that almost destroyed their car, they got lost, and their maps were burnt up.204.80.61.110 (talk) 15:20, 30 November 2010 (UTC)Bennett Turk

Lawyer[edit]

Who played him? — Preceding unsigned comment added by Johnny 42 (talkcontribs) 19:27, 15 June 2011 (UTC)

Reception[edit]

The reception section is a mess, and is in need of a complete reorganization, improvement of the refs, and a more clear description of what specific critics said about the film. One assertion is that the film received critical applause, with a reference that says "the film never gets off the ground." This simply makes no sense. ---The Old JacobiteThe '45 21:09, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

Indeed! Miles Creagh (talk) 21:12, 1 August 2012 (UTC)
The business figures, both for earnings and budget, are very suspect too. I've replaced the claim that it "earned over 150,000,000" with the figure for its domestic gross. I seem to recall the budget was nearer to $30m than $15m, but I'll need to find a source for that. Miles Creagh (talk) 21:20, 1 August 2012 (UTC)

House[edit]

Is the house Steve Martin and his family live in, the same one used for Home Alone? It looks like it. 72.86.42.38 (talk) 02:57, 22 November 2012 (UTC)

Unsourced material[edit]

Below information was tagged for needing sources long-term. Feel free to reinsert with appropriate references. DonIago (talk) 18:57, 8 May 2014 (UTC)

Budget[edit]

The current entry says that the budget was $30 million. This is almost certainly incorrect; it's almost unthinkable. Ghostbusters (with all its special effects and three well-known actors) had a budget of $30 million. Compared with other movies from 1987, Three Men and a Baby was $11 million, Beverly Hills Cop II was $20 million, Good Morning, Vietnam was $13 million, and Lethal Weapon was $15 million. For John Hughes movies, The Breakfast Club was $1 million, Pretty in Pink was $6 million, Ferris Bueller's Day Off was $6 million, Uncle Buck was $15 million, and Home Alone was $18 million. I highly doubt the $30 million figure for this movie. Bueller 007 (talk) 08:30, 26 November 2014 (UTC)

Googling "Planes, Trains & Automobiles budget" gives an answer of $15 million which seems more likely although there's no source and no information on any of the top search results. ClarkF1 (talk) 00:23, 22 December 2015 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

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Steve martin discusses the film[edit]

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/news/the-john-candy-joke-that-still-makes-steve-martin-cry/ar-AAC2zzd?ocid=spartanntp

Majinsnake (talk) 21:05, 28 May 2019 (UTC)

TIL[edit]

People trains don't run outta Stubbville because it doesn't exist. Instead people trains run outta Newton.

Quote: "The nearest Amtrak station is in Newton 25 miles (40 km) north" Maikel (talk) 10:30, 12 June 2019 (UTC)

dvd versions[edit]

I have two dvd versions of the movie. One is the "Those Aren't Pillows!" Edition, which has the airplane food scene in it that the other doesn't have. Yet they are both listed as being 92 minutes. I wonder what the total differences in the two versions are. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 2600:8804:A00:C900:A47A:5205:F094:92F0 (talk) 15:39, 12 July 2019 (UTC)

"Critical acclaim on release"?[edit]

The article says "It was greeted with critical acclaim upon release", but is that true? The only reference in support of the statement is a Jay Carr review, which judging from the title ("'PLANES, TRAINS' NEVER GETS OFF THE GROUND") says the opposite. Writing years later, Roger Ebert said, "Some movies are obviously great. Others gradually thrust their greatness upon us." [1] - indicating it was not immediately acclaimed as a great film. Adpete (talk) 02:01, 4 December 2019 (UTC)

I agree with your concern and have tagged the statement requesting a better source. DonIago (talk) 02:23, 4 December 2019 (UTC)

A movie from the 1980s[edit]

It must be mentioned that the version of the 1980s that was shown in the film was handled with kid gloves. In other words, controversy was carefully killed, as were any class perspectives. "Hey!" someone might say. "This was a light comedy, what are you talking about?"

Steve Martin by the late 80s and 90s mostly played roles where he simply wasn't poor and money was never a problem. The epitome of someone in the 1980s who was going to be the star. People were and are openly hostile to poverty. In PTA Martin's character is obviously a very wealthy "marketer" working in New York City with a castle sized house who gets humbled by someone who isn't exactly poor (although he is) but doesn't have love in his life. This kills any class discussion. Unrelated perhaps to the article is the fact that by the 1990s Steve Martin had mostly devolved from crazed comedy to playing a father troubled by rich family issues - apparently to the delight of the paying public. What is the point of this "section" that sounds like it is critical of a sweet comedy with a happy ending? The producers of this film hid the America of the 1980s. A man with a trunk in an airport who has no hope of making money - especially not something as ludicrous as selling shower curtain rings, for which there were few if any such jobs - might have been too sad. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 68.33.74.120 (talk) 21:06, 25 February 2020 (UTC)

Interesting, but original research unless you can provide sources which have discussed this. Cheers. DonIago (talk) 18:54, 17 March 2020 (UTC)